Posts Tagged ‘Pool Stick’

Funny Don’ts and Do’s With Pool Sticks

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

 

Funny Don’ts and Do’s With Pool Sticks

By Susan Herrmann

Pool sticks were made for just that… shooting pool. And that means using pool sticks to correctly hit billiard balls on a pool table, not for javelin-throwing in the swimming pool. I have to admit that as a kid, I occasionally used my pool stick for things other than the intended use. Even though using it as a limbo stick wasn’t necessarily harmful to the stick, using it as a sword was. Take some tips from a long-time billiard player who has learned some important do’s & don’ts the hard way, and learn some important tips along the way.

For more info, visit my websites…
Pool For Beginners
Pool and Pocket Billiards Resource

Even though you can make nice chalk designs on the ceiling, don’t. The tip of a pool stick is made of leather and is attached to the shaft of the stick with a ferrule. These are tender spots on a cue stick and should not be used to come in contact with anything other than chalk or a billiard ball. If the rounded leather tip loses its shape or is transformed into the all too common “mushroom”, your shots will be less consistent and it will severely affect your play.

I know of a pool stick that was left outside for a day or two after an exhausting duel. This is really bad. Your pool stick should be stored indoors, upright in a case. Exposure of the elements (sun & moisture) can be fatal. Both the shaft and butt of a billiard cue are made of wood and can warp. If that happens, it cannot be fixed and you may as well use it as firewood where it will serve you better.

If your cue stick is wrapped, don’t peel the wrapping like you would a Budweiser label. Wraps are put there for a reason. They give you a firm, comfortable grip on your cue stick and prevent your hand from slipping when you strike a billiard ball.

Lastly, don’t bounce your cue stick to the beat of the music (or off your competitor’s forehead). The rubber piece on the end of the butt is called a bumper. The bumper is put there to protect the cue stick when it accidentally bumps a wall or the table, or when it rests on the ground. The bumper adds to the precise weight of the billiard cue and should not become loosened. Repetitive impacts to the bumper can also cause the butt to eventually crack.

Take my advice and value your pool stick. If you do, it will perform for you every time. Don’t twirl it like a baton, use it to poke a bear, or use it to pick your nose. There are other instruments for those things. Your cue stick’s health and maintenance are vital in playing your best game.

Susan Herrmann http://www.ugetballs.com is an avid pool player. Her website is a great resource for collegiate pool table ball sets & pool sticks. Visit today for a huge selection! While you are there, take a look at the pool table covers, pool cue balls & eight balls.

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Billiards and “Take a Cue”

Monday, November 30th, 2009


Billiards and “Take a Cue”

Billiards and “Take a Cue”

By Yossarian Fisher

Physics, aside from being a challenging high school subject, is also the main governing force of all matter in the universe. It also governs how much energy you need to exert on a pool stick when making a break or what direction a ball will bounce off to when it hits another. Of course, we are not going to count the numerical value of energy one has to exert. There is just no way for our mind to convert that information into muscle signals. Instead, this information is learned through practice and experience of playing the game.

Pockets on Every Corner

While it can be said that practice is the essential building block of any good athlete, practicing the game of billiards is an entirely different matter all together. The idea of the game itself is simple, using a stick; a player must poke a white ball -and only the white ball, towards colored balls in an attempt to make them fall into any of six holes on the pool table. For now, let us put aside the fact that there are rules that dictate the order of colors a player must successfully land in the holes, also known as pockets. This leaves us with a very simple of a knock-balls-into-holes kind of game. Is it simple enough?

For more info, visit my websites…
Pool For Beginners
Pool and Pocket Billiards Resource

Not always. In a basic nine ball set up, there will be ten balls in play. One cue ball, and the nine colored billiard balls. These nine balls will not conveniently place themselves in a straight path between the cue ball and a hole. Even if some did, it does not mean that landing one good shot will place your cue ball properly for the next shot. This means that on a basic level, the average pool player is considering how he or she must make the cue ball hit another billiard ball which in turn, would both cause a billiard ball to fall in the pocket and leave the cue ball in a desirable position where it may knock another target into the hole. That alone may seem plenty. There is more though.

Rack ‘Em and Shoot ‘Em

Now we reconsider the previously set aside fact that there are certain pool rules about the order of balls that must be hit.

All that is missing is the fact that if a player fails to successfully pocket a proper ball in his or her turn, then they will lose that turn. So in the event that the player knows that there are not good shots to be made, the player must then play the round with the consideration of placing the cue ball in an equally inappropriate location so the that opponent would not be able to score.

This is why playing billiards is not easy for beginners. There are plenty of things that can only be learned through constant practice. It is amazing when we consider how fast a pool player’s mind quickly calculates the different factors of this game. In tournaments and other major competitions, these players show tremendous ability to concentrate and zone out from the cheering crowd which allows them to pick up that cue stick and still make good shots; and for all the scientific physics that occurs in every game, watching a round of pool is akin to witnessing magic. GP

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Play Better Pool With Your Own Cue Stick

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

Play Better Pool With Your Own Cue Stick

By Ernie Reynolds

I’ve always been a casual pool player. Don’t get me wrong – I always play to win, but I never had much of a desire to enter tournaments or play in leagues.

As such, I never bothered to get my own pool cue for many, many years. I always just grabbed one off the rack at the bar or pool hall. I never wanted to bother with carrying a cue stick around and having to keep on eye on it so it didn’t get stolen or damaged.

For more info, visit my websites…
Pool For Beginners
Pool and Pocket Billiards Resource

Well, it took me a long time, but I have finally seen the light. My wife bought me a new pool cue for Christmas last year, (I picked it out), and I will never be without my own cue stick again.

This conviction was reinforced last Friday when I went down to the local bar for a cold one and some pool. I didn’t have to work Friday because of the July 4th holiday, so I went down in the early aftenoon instead of later on after work as I usually do.

I had my stick in the car but I didn’t bring it in with me because I wasn’t sure if anyone would be in there to play a game with. As it turns out, I ended up playing pool for a couple solid hours – with a bar cue.

I played a couple guys that were fair shooters and I did OK, but not really up to my usual standards. I had a hard time getting comfortable with the sticks that were there and eventually tried several different ones. None of them really felt right.

Eventually I ended up leaving and going to a pool hall where I have a standing Friday night appointment with my brother to play. I took my stick in with me this time because my brother plays pretty well and I have to be at my best to win some games.

I could tell the difference in my shooting the very first game. The stick just felt comfortable in my hands and I had much more control over the cue ball and could make it dance around the table.

My consistency took a quantum leap. With the bar cue I had to really concentrate to get a good hit on the cue ball. With my own familiar cue, that just came naturally and I could pay more attention to planning out my shots and running the table.

I keep my tip nicely rounded, and this makes the shooting so much more precise than the flattened, mushy tips on the bar cues. I could get some draw on the ball again, and the weight is right, so controlling the speed of the cue ball hit was much easier.

The smooth shaft allows my stick to slide effortlessly through my bridge fingers. It’s amazing the difference in your play when there are no dents and stickiness to the shaft to ruin your feel of the stroke.

It may sound funny, but there really was the difference of night and day between playing with that bar stick and my own clean, smooth, and straight pool cue.

So take it from a late-in-life convert to owning your own pool stick – buy one, you won’t regret it. Once you get a stick that has the right weight and feels good in your hands, it just makes the game of pool all that much easier and more enjoyable.

I just wonder why it took me so long to find out.